Showing posts tagged Beach

" Surf Fishing "  

(Source: bandanna-almanac.com)

sailorgil:

" Why Guys Join The Navy "  …  Vintage Postcard [Circa 1960]

sailorgil:

" Why Guys Join The Navy "  …  Vintage Postcard [Circa 1960]

(Reblogged from sailorgil)

sailorgil:

" A Pretty Kettle of Fish "  …  by Oliver Herford, Ladies Home Journal, Sept 1927

[Sailor Gil Collection]

(Reblogged from sailorgil)

" The Tide "  …  Artist:  Michelle Spalding

(Source: fly-by-night.net)

" Coconut Beach " 

" Coconut Beach " 

(Source: nono-tropics)

(Reblogged from manfromjapan)

seeingsounds:

Successful day at the beach

(Reblogged from foresail)
oldpainting:


Kunisada (1786-1865) - 1825 Crab on the Beach (Private Collection) by RasMarley on Flickr.
Shikishiban; 207 x 183 cm.  Utagawa Kunisada (Japanese: 歌川 国貞; also known as Utagawa Toyokuni III (三代歌川豊国); 1786 – 12 January 1865) was the most popular, prolific and financially successful designer of ukiyo-e woodblock prints in 19th-century Japan. In his own time, his reputation far exceeded that of his contemporaries, Hokusai, Hiroshige and Kuniyoshi. At the end of the Edo Period (1603–1867), Hiroshige, Kuniyoshi and Kunisada were the three best representatives of the Japanese color woodcut in Edo (capital city of Japan, now Tokyo). However, among European and American collectors of Japanese prints, beginning in the late 19th and early 20th century, all three of these artists were actually regarded as rather inferior to the greats of classical ukiyo-e, and therefore as having contributed considerably to the downfall of their art. For this reason, some referred to their works as “decadent”. Beginning in the 1930s and 1970s, respectively, the works of Hiroshige and Kuniyoshi were submitted to a re-evaluation, and these two are now counted among the masters of their art. Thus, from Kunisada alone was withheld, for a long time, the acknowledgment which is due to him. With a few exceptions, such as actor portraits (yakusha-e) and portraits of beautiful women (Bijinga), at the beginning of his career, and some series of large-size actor head-portraits near the end, it was thought that he had produced only inferior works. It was not until the early 1990s, with the appearance of Jan van Doesburg’s overview of the artistic development of Kunisada, and Sebastian Izzard’s extensive study of his work, that this picture began to change, with Kunisada more clearly revealed as one of the “giants” of the Japanese print that he was. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kunisada

oldpainting:

Kunisada (1786-1865) - 1825 Crab on the Beach (Private Collection) by RasMarley on Flickr.

Shikishiban; 207 x 183 cm.



Utagawa Kunisada (Japanese: 歌川 国貞; also known as Utagawa Toyokuni III (三代歌川豊国); 1786 – 12 January 1865) was the most popular, prolific and financially successful designer of ukiyo-e woodblock prints in 19th-century Japan. In his own time, his reputation far exceeded that of his contemporaries, Hokusai, Hiroshige and Kuniyoshi.



At the end of the Edo Period (1603–1867), Hiroshige, Kuniyoshi and Kunisada were the three best representatives of the Japanese color woodcut in Edo (capital city of Japan, now Tokyo). However, among European and American collectors of Japanese prints, beginning in the late 19th and early 20th century, all three of these artists were actually regarded as rather inferior to the greats of classical ukiyo-e, and therefore as having contributed considerably to the downfall of their art. For this reason, some referred to their works as “decadent”.



Beginning in the 1930s and 1970s, respectively, the works of Hiroshige and Kuniyoshi were submitted to a re-evaluation, and these two are now counted among the masters of their art. Thus, from Kunisada alone was withheld, for a long time, the acknowledgment which is due to him. With a few exceptions, such as actor portraits (yakusha-e) and portraits of beautiful women (Bijinga), at the beginning of his career, and some series of large-size actor head-portraits near the end, it was thought that he had produced only inferior works. It was not until the early 1990s, with the appearance of Jan van Doesburg’s overview of the artistic development of Kunisada, and Sebastian Izzard’s extensive study of his work, that this picture began to change, with Kunisada more clearly revealed as one of the “giants” of the Japanese print that he was.



en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kunisada

(Reblogged from oldpainting)

Coming Soon: To A Beach Near You

" International Coastal Cleanup —  20 Sep 2014 "  …  To help / sign up go to:  

http://www.oceanconservancy.org/our-work/international-coastal-cleanup/sign-up-to-clean-up.html 

Facts and Figures from the 2013 event: 

image

image

The full report is here:  http://issuu.com/jyeary/docs/tfs_data_report_final?e=10446736/7930585 

(Reblogged from haruchonns)
(Reblogged from swimming-withmermaids)
" Mermaid and Fisherman "  …  Photographer:  Julia Usunow

" Mermaid and Fisherman "  …  Photographer:  Julia Usunow

(Source: meerjungfrauen.eu)

disminucion:

Sunrise Kailua, Mario Lichacz

disminucion:

Sunrise Kailua, Mario Lichacz

(Reblogged from trout-heart)

" Smoking at the Beach " 

(Source: flickr.com)

(Reblogged from giftvintage)

" Asian Merman " 

(Source: gayasiancollection.com)