Showing posts tagged Hawaii

manfromjapan:

Lunar eclipse 8 Oct 2014 over HI

(Reblogged from manfromjapan)
" Don The Beachcomber "  …  Donn Beach, ‘The Original’ … Vintage [1956] Souvenir Menu Mailer

Read more about the the man:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_the_Beachcomber 

" Don The Beachcomber "  …  Donn Beach, ‘The Original’ … Vintage [1956] Souvenir Menu Mailer

Read more about the the man:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_the_Beachcomber 

(Source: arkivatropika.com)

" Hawaiian Maiden "  …  Typical of what greeted the arrival of whaling seaman at Lahaina, Maui in the 1820’s:

Whalers and missionaries arrived in Lahaina in the 20s of the XIX century, but soon came into conflict. Shortly after arriving on the island, where he landed in 1823, William Richards, the first Protestant missionary to Lahaina, converted to Christianity, the governor of Maui, Hoapili. Thanks to the influence of Richards, Hoapili passed laws that punished drunkenness and loose morals, so the whalers had to go elsewhere to find alcohol and women after spending months at sea and did not take kindly puritanical influence of the missionaries. In 1826 the English Captain William Buckle made ​​a stop in Lahaina in Maui and found that it had been introduced a new ‘missionaries’ taboo’ against the men who womanizing. The crew, enraged, went ashore to take revenge on Richards, beside which, however, sided with a group of Hawaiian Christians forced the whalers to leave. In 1827, Governor Hoapili arrest the captain of the ship John Palmer for having women on board, and as the crew retaliated with gunfire at Richards’ house.The captain was released, but the laws - and tensions - remained. After the death of the governor Hoapili laws against alcohol and prostitution were less strictly enforced, and the whalers returned to attend Lahaina. Towards the middle of the nineteenth century, two-thirds of the whalers who came to Hawaii landed in Lahaina, which took place in Honolulu as the most important port of the archipelago. The whaling industry began to show signs of crisis in the 1860s, as a result of the impoverishment of the last reserves of the Arctic, and finally received the coup de grace by the emergence of the oil industry. With the disappearance of the whalers, Lahaina became something of a ghost town.

" Hawaiian Maiden "  …  Typical of what greeted the arrival of whaling seaman at Lahaina, Maui in the 1820’s:

Whalers and missionaries arrived in Lahaina in the 20s of the XIX century, but soon came into conflict. Shortly after arriving on the island, where he landed in 1823, William Richards, the first Protestant missionary to Lahaina, converted to Christianity, the governor of Maui, Hoapili. Thanks to the influence of Richards, Hoapili passed laws that punished drunkenness and loose morals, so the whalers had to go elsewhere to find alcohol and women after spending months at sea and did not take kindly puritanical influence of the missionaries. In 1826 the English Captain William Buckle made ​​a stop in Lahaina in Maui and found that it had been introduced a new ‘missionaries’ taboo’ against the men who womanizing. The crew, enraged, went ashore to take revenge on Richards, beside which, however, sided with a group of Hawaiian Christians forced the whalers to leave. In 1827, Governor Hoapili arrest the captain of the ship John Palmer for having women on board, and as the crew retaliated with gunfire at Richards’ house.The captain was released, but the laws - and tensions - remained. After the death of the governor Hoapili laws against alcohol and prostitution were less strictly enforced, and the whalers returned to attend Lahaina. Towards the middle of the nineteenth century, two-thirds of the whalers who came to Hawaii landed in Lahaina, which took place in Honolulu as the most important port of the archipelago. The whaling industry began to show signs of crisis in the 1860s, as a result of the impoverishment of the last reserves of the Arctic, and finally received the coup de grace by the emergence of the oil industry. With the disappearance of the whalers, Lahaina became something of a ghost town.

(Source: terreceltiche.altervista.org)

" Standing Room Only "  …  Princess Theater, Honolulu [Circa 1945]

" Standing Room Only "  …  Princess Theater, Honolulu [Circa 1945]

(Source: facebook.com)

" Diamond Head "  …  Vintage Photograph [Circa 1920’s] by:  ”Williams Studio, Honolulu, T.H.” which is stamped on the reverse … The photographer, James J. Williams, started his business in Hawaii in 1879 and he died in 1926  …  [Flea Market Find]

[Sailor Gil Collection] 

(Source: sailorgil.com)

" Triple Play " 

(Source: joshuafountain)

(Reblogged from adesignresearcher)

" This Lady Gets Around "  …  I’m certain that I saw this lady previously, with a different sailor !

(Reblogged from joshuafountain)

sailorgil:

" Pipe Smoking Sailor Buddies in Hawaii " 

Photo courtesy of “Collection of David Claudon”

(Reblogged from sailorgil)

" Someone’s In Love !! " 

(Reblogged from joshuafountain)

sailorgil:

" Double Trouble "

joshuafountain:

c. 1940s

(Reblogged from sailorgil)

" Mermaid Kariel "  …  Hawaii … http://www.mermaidkariel.com/

nyworldsfaircollections:

Happy Birthday Hawaii

Aloha!  Today is Hawaiian Statehood Day, when Hawaii’s admission as the 50th state occurred on August 21, 1959.  Here’s a brief history lesson: In 1898 the United States annexed Hawaii as one of its spoils from its victory in the Spanish-American war.  The United States had a vested interest in the islands for some time, coveting its strategic placement as a navy base.  During World War II, Oahu served as a command post for US operations in the Pacific, as large portions of the region were turned over to US military bases. After the war, two-thirds of the residents favored statehood.  However, resistance to Hawaiian statehood was plentiful, particularly in the segregated south.  A primary election took place in Hawaii on June 27, 1959, and various statehood propositions received many votes on that day. Following the certification of the election results, President Eisenhower signed a proclamation on August 21, 1959, declaring Hawaii to be the 50th state.

-Wendy Jimenez, Archival Fellow

Top: Brochure from the World’s Fair Collection at the Queens Museum. Gift of Michael Shernoff, 1988.89.44WF64.

Bottom: Photo from the World’s Fair Collection at the Queens Museum. Gift of Peter Warner.

(Reblogged from nyworldsfaircollections)

nofrillsretro:

BEAUTIFUL HAWAIIAN GIRL, VINTAGE 35mm COLOR SLIDE, 1950s

(Reblogged from greedylittlepig)

" The Reversal of ‘A Girl in Every Port’ Is ‘A Sailor from Every Ship’ !! "  …  Vintage Studio Portrait, 1940’s

(Reblogged from joshuafountain)

" Hawaii "   …  Vintage Pan Am Advertising

(Source: bohemianpuna)

(Reblogged from billyboyfan)